Europe's Lost World
Here’s a lovely image of what the lost land of Doggerland may have looked like. Ynyshir in Ceredigion (Wales) has many habitats which are reminiscent of those in the Mesolithic, and pollen from many of the species present in this image has been found in core samples recovered from the North Sea. Many thanks to Denis Bates for image.

Here’s a lovely image of what the lost land of Doggerland may have looked like. Ynyshir in Ceredigion (Wales) has many habitats which are reminiscent of those in the Mesolithic, and pollen from many of the species present in this image has been found in core samples recovered from the North Sea. Many thanks to Denis Bates for image.

A quiet moment before the crowds arrived - the number of visitors yesterday was fantastic and more are expected today - all in all it looks like its going to be a very exciting exhibition.

A quiet moment before the crowds arrived - the number of visitors yesterday was fantastic and more are expected today - all in all it looks like its going to be a very exciting exhibition.

After a final run through, the display has been set up and road tested. Here’s a quick sneak peak of the back of the display - all assembled and ready to go !
See you all at the exhibition !

After a final run through, the display has been set up and road tested. Here’s a quick sneak peak of the back of the display - all assembled and ready to go !

See you all at the exhibition !

Here are a couple of mystery objects from our replica collection - can you guess what they are, and how they were used in the landscape of Doggerland ?

All will be revealed at the exhibit !

Finally the bow is complete - Mark has worked hard using the adze to produce the rough shape of the bow, and then has smoothed out the wood with a flint scraper. The final step has been to sand the sides with a sandstone block to give the bow a good finish.

The bow is now finished and ready for the exhibition !

For those of you who have asked, Mark who has made our replica bow can be contacted at mesoknapper@yahoo.co.uk

To shape the limbs of the bow, a carving adze has had to be made. The shaft is in ash and the adze is carved from antler. It’s been lashed together using red deer leather which has been soaked for 24 hours. This is because on drying the leather clamps everything together tight and helps stop the shaft from splitting during usage. Now all that has to be done is to use it !

Our replicas are currently being created by the very talented Mark Keighley

Replic production for the exhibit continues apace - this week it’s a spot experimental archaeology in the form of bow making. At the moment, Mark has split the wood and is now being preparing for working the limbs of the bow. We’ll pop up more photo’s as the experiment progresses….

This is the development leading up to the science exhibition, demonstrating key features of the simple game of finding a location for our Mesolithic friends to live. Algorithums for the building of villages, agent navigation, scoring and leaderboard are all now done. All that remains is a small amount of fine tuning, so all looks good for gaming at the exhibition. See you there !

summer-science:

Ever had a scientist explain their work to you while canoeing off the coast of Scotland? Well here’s your chance with to Dr Richard Bates from the Drowned landscapes exhibit.

You can see our other exhibition videos here www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7AB285E3994232C6

The rest of the exhibition website can be found here www.royalsociety.org/sciencelive