Europe's Lost World

We’re getting on well with the game. The game’s user interface has been developed and will make interacting with the game both simple and straightforward. It has been deisgned to make the game accessible to the widest range of players. The next step is to build the scoring system and leader board …..(!)

We are currently having some replica stone tools made by Mark Keighley for demonstration on the exhibit.

The first image shows the basic knapping tool kit which is used. This consists of a small hammer stone, as well as small and large antler hammers and a leather hand guard.

The second image shows the results, so far using a north sea flint cobble. On the left of the photo is the remains of the source material, in the middle the completed scraper and on the right, the resultant debitage.

All looking good, and we’ll be sure to have some interesting things for you to see and handle at the exhibit.

summer-science:

Ever had a scientist explain their work to you while canoeing off the coast of Scotland? Well here’s your chance with to Dr Richard Bates from the Drowned landscapes exhibit.

You can see our other exhibition videos here www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7AB285E3994232C6

The rest of the exhibition website can be found here www.royalsociety.org/sciencelive 

Progress on the game continues apace: the touch table survival game now has touch navigation with zooming features, so this stage is now complete. The next step will be to develop the logic of the game and the user interface buttons that will allow users to accomplish the game tasks.

This is a video blog of the current progress of the game in which visitors can participate in at the Summer Exhibition. At present the touch table navigation is being developed - so watch this space for more videos soon !

Some of the project team are currently undertaking geophysical survey at Happisburgh at the moment. Happisburgh is an important archaeological site, where stone tools showed that humans occupied the area some 800,000 years ago, and thus is the oldest evidence for human occupation anywhere in the UK. The current results are promising and the team also found a very interesting find whilst working, we’ll let you know what it is later……

There has been a fair bit of progress on the game over the Easter Break. The scene has now been finalised, along with all the props and people - all they need now is just a bit of tidying up. Additionally, all the general motor function and reactive behaviour is now done. The game will allow people to move around the landscape and at the end of a timed session, pick a location for the best survival location (food, resources, safety) to build a village. After that we’ll send in the calamities (Water rising, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and a UFO invasion, - just joking for the last four hazards !), and the more the village comes out unscathed, the higher the points will be. The next task is to think about appropriate prizes for the highest scores !

There has been a fair bit of progress on the game over the Easter Break. The scene has now been finalised, along with all the props and people - all they need now is just a bit of tidying up. Additionally, all the general motor function and reactive behaviour is now done. The game will allow people to move around the landscape and at the end of a timed session, pick a location for the best survival location (food, resources, safety) to build a village. After that we’ll send in the calamities (Water rising, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes and a UFO invasion, - just joking for the last four hazards !), and the more the village comes out unscathed, the higher the points will be. The next task is to think about appropriate prizes for the highest scores !

We thought it would be good to show you an agent based computer model, created by Dr. Eugene Ch’ng, which the exhibit’s game is being based upon. This movie shows a Mesolithic person walking around the North Sea landscape looking for resources (the agents thoughts are shown as pictograms) and eventually a place to call home. This agent uses artifical intelligence to find its own way around the landscape, however for the exhibit we’ll be using your skills and imagination to survive.

The project team have been delighted to find that the submerged landscape of Doggerland has recently been immortalised as a limerick. We hope this brightens your day as much as it did ours.

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Doggerland

Back in Doggerland (landmass of old):

We were freezing our nuts off with cold.

But with warmth comes surprise,

For as sea levels rise

We’re seceding from Europe, I’m told.

by Andrew Burnett.


Note: Doggerland was a landmass in northern Europe, which existed from the end of the last Ice Age until about 6300BC. As the ice melted and the sea level rose, pasts of it were flooded, separating Britain from the European mainland.